WordPress 4.4 Removes the View Post and Get Shortlink Buttons From the Post Editor by Jeff Chandler

In WordPress 4.4, the View Post button in the post editor is disappearing in favor of a clickable permalink. Four years ago, Scribu, who is a former WordPress contributor, created ticket #18306. In the ticket, Scribu explains that the View Post button is redundant functionality and suggests that it be removed in favor of a clickable permalink.

Here are two screenshots of the post editor. The first is WordPress 4.3 and the second is WordPress 4.4. Clicking the permalink allows you to preview the post in its current state. Notice the slug part of the URL is in bold. You need to click the Edit button to edit the permalink.

WordPress 4.3 Post Editor

WordPress 4.4 Post Editor

Not only does this change remove redundant functionality, it removes a UI element from the page. Enhancements like these are a huge win for WordPress because it makes the interface simpler without permanently removing the button’s purpose.

In addition to the View Post button, the Get Shortlink button is also removed. The button shows up if you’re using a custom shortlink and can be re-enabled using code or a plugin. For most users, the Edit button is the only one they’ll see between the post title and content box.

I expect some users will be frustrated as they go through the process of changing their workflow but overall, I think it’s a great improvement. What do you think?


If you’re using the WordPress beta testing plugin by Peter Westwood, I encourage you to set it to bleeding edge nightlies and update your site. You’ll be able to test this change and others during the WordPress 4.4 development cycle.

Annunci

The rooftops of Paris – Palais Garnier

Kamal Bennani Photography

DSCF7468

The Palais Garnier is a 1,979-seat opera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. It was originally called the Salle des Capucines because of its location on the Boulevard des Capucines in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, but soon became known as the Palais Garnier in recognition of its opulence and its architect, Charles Garnier. The theatre is also often referred to as the Opéra Garnier, and historically was known as the Opéra de Paris or simply the Opéra, as it was the primary home of the Paris Opera and its associated Paris Opera Ballet until 1989, when the Opéra Bastille opened at the Place de la Bastille. The Paris Opera now mainly uses the Palais Garnier for ballet.

The Palais Garnier is “probably the most famous opera house in the world, a symbol of Paris like Notre Dame Cathedral, the Louvre, or the Sacré…

View original post 176 altre parole

Life along a stream (Picardie, France)

Kamal Bennani Photography

DSCF3450

Shot taken near Guizancourt (Somme, Picardie, France).


Somme is a department of France, located in the north of the country and named after the Somme river. It is part of the Picardy region of France.

The north central area of the Somme was the site of a series of battles during World War I. Particularly significant was the 1916 Battle of the Somme. As a result of this and other battles fought in the area the department is home to many military cemeteries and several major monuments commemorating the many soldiers from various countries who died on its battlefields. The famed Battle of Cressy also took place in this department.

Picardy is one of the 27 regions of France. It is located in the northern part of France.


History

The historical province of Picardy stretched from north of Noyon to Calais, via the whole of the Somme department and the north…

View original post 603 altre parole

Pont Alexandre III, Paris

Kamal Bennani Photography

DSCF8775

The Pont Alexandre III is a deck arch bridge that spans the Seine in Paris. It connects the Champs-Élysées quarter with those of the Invalides and Eiffel Tower. The bridge is widely regarded as the most ornate, extravagant bridge in the city. It is classified as a French Monument historique.

History

The Beaux-Arts style bridge, with its exuberant Art Nouveau lamps, cherubs, nymphs and winged horses at either end, was built between 1896 and 1900. It is named after Tsar Alexander III, who had concluded the Franco-Russian Alliance in 1892. His son Nicholas II laid the foundation stone in October 1896. The style of the bridge reflects that of the Grand Palais, to which it leads on the right bank.

The construction of the bridge is a marvel of 19th century engineering, consisting of a 6 metres (20 ft) high single span steel arch. The design, by the architects Joseph…

View original post 321 altre parole